Ruminations and recipes from a small kitchen in a big city.

28.7.16

Out of time.

An agency I once worked with had plenty of money to spend on lunches. Well, they all did; but this one had more than most.

It had a lot of government business, and when bureaucrats throw money at advertising campaigns, they don't count it first. Counting money is for the private sector. Governments don't spend their own money; they spend yours, so why stint? They can always get their hands on more.

Anyway, the agency wanted to reward its clients for being loyal. The CEO decided to take its $5 million-plus clients to dinner, and give each an expensive Swiss watch. He'd written the presentation card himself, omitting to run it past the copywriter:

'We'd like to thank you for being a client by giving you this timeless watch.'

26.7.16

What do you do in your lunch break?

Here's what I do in mine.

(Note: the AdAge article is almost ten years old; I came across it again by accident when trawling through some old writings. The advertising agency blog is no longer online - I am adapting it into a book. And yes, I still have the same sandwich and three sugars in my coffee.)

6.7.16

Soup or pasta? Cold weather dilemma solved.

The answer is both, if you serve the following for dinner. It satisfies both soup- and pasta-lovers.

Tortellini soup.

First, make some vegetable stock (or use your preferred stock). In a large pot containing about 1500ml of water, bring to the boil a large chopped carrot, a large chopped onion, a stick of chopped celery, a chopped leek, some parsley sprigs, a peeled and scored garlic clove, a bay leaf, a little dried rosemary, a teaspoon of cracked pepper and half a teaspoon of salt. Once on the boil, turn down and simmer for an hour.

Strain the stock, return to pot and add half a kilogram of ricotta tortellini, a cupful of finely shredded silver beet, a cup of peas and a tablespoon of preferably home-made pesto (basil, walnuts, parmesan, garlic, olive oil).

Simmer another twenty minutes. Serve with shards of parmesan cheese broken from the block.