Ruminations and recipes from a small kitchen in a big city.

27.7.06

Name the author.

… George said that, as we had plenty of time, it would be a splendid opportunity to try a good, slap-up supper. He said he would show us what could be done up the river in the way of cooking, and suggested that, with the vegetables and the remains of the cold beef and general odds and ends, we should make an Irish stew.

It seemed a fascinating idea. George gathered wood and made a fire, and Harris and I started to peel the potatoes.

… George said it was absurd to have only four potatoes in an Irish stew, so we washed half-a-dozen or so more, and put them in without peeling. We also put in a cabbage and about half a peck of peas. George stirred it all up, and then he said that there seemed to be a lot of room to spare, so we overhauled both the hampers, and picked out all the odds and ends and the remnants, and added them to the stew. There were half a pork pie and a bit of cold boiled bacon left, and we put them in. Then George found half a tin of potted salmon, and he emptied that into the pot.

He said that was the advantage of Irish stew: you got rid of such a lot of things. I fished out a couple of eggs that had got cracked, and put those in. George said they would thicken the gravy.

I forget the other ingredients, but I know nothing was wasted; and I remember that, towards the end, Montmorency, who had evinced great interest in the proceedings throughout, strolled away with an earnest and thoughtful air, reappearing, a few minutes afterwards, with a dead water-rat in his mouth, which he evidently wished to present as his contribution to the dinner; whether in a sarcastic spirit, or with a genuine desire to assist, I cannot say.

We had a discussion as to whether the rat should go in or not. Harris said that he thought it would be all right, mixed up with the other things, and that every little helped; but George stood up for precedent. He said he had never heard of water-rats in Irish stew, and he would rather be on the safe side, and not try experiments.

Harris said: "If you never try a new thing, how can you tell what it's like? It's men such as you that hamper the world's progress. Think of the man who first tried German sausage!"

It was a great success, that Irish stew. I don't think I ever enjoyed a meal more. There was something so fresh and piquant about it. One's palate gets so tired of the old hackneyed things: here was a dish with a new flavour, with a taste like nothing else on earth.


UPDATE

Well picked, Selwyn - Jerome K. Jerome's Three Men in a Boat, one of my favourites. (It's a great book to read aloud to a willing audience.) BTW, the extract is from Project Gutenberg which is a godsend when you have some down time at work and a computer in front of you. I once read Jerome's entire Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow in one sitting. That was probably BB (Before Blogs).

3 comments:

Selwyn said...

Ooooohhhh... would that be Jerome K. Jerome "Three Men In A Boat (to say nothing of the dog)"?

I wouldn't follow that recipe!

Ian T. said...

Yes, indeed! A classic! I especially like the bit about work.

sharpatootha said...

Oh i love that book. The section where they're packing the hamper never fails to have me weeping with laughter.